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Bellringing in the Knightley Parishes 

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All church towers in the Knightley Parishes contain a very large percussion instrument -  a ring of bells!

If you want to ring, learn to ring or have the bells rung for a special occasion, please contact the person named below using the Staff and Leadership page.

All bellringing, other than clock chimes and chiming or tolling by one person or people from the same household bubble, is stopped by the current coronavirus pandemic.
Arrangements for restarting ringing, when possible, are available here

BADBY
  Bells:  6 bells tenor bell weighs 716 kg 
  Practice Night:  Every Wednesday 7:30pm to 9:00pm
  Sunday Ringing:  Usually 45 mins before services
  Contact: Geoff Pullin

   CHARWELTON
  Bells:  5 bells tenor bell weighs 541 kg 
  Practice Night:  By arrangement
  Sunday Ringing:  By arrangement
  Contact: Graham White

   FAWSLEY
  Bells:   4 bells tenor bell weighs 573 kg 
  Sunday Ringing: By arrangement
  Contact: Vivienne Baker

   NEWNHAM
  Bells:   6 bells. tenor bell weighs 661 kg 
  Practice Night:  Every Tuesday 8:00pm to 9:00pm
  Sunday Ringing:  By arrangement
  Contact: Bob Sinclair

   PRESTON CAPES
  Bells:   5 bells tenor bell weighs 900 kg 
  Practice Night:  Some Wednesdays 7:30pm to 8:30pm
  Sunday Ringing:  By arrangement
  Contact: Graham White or Sheila Bull


Across the country, the great majority of bells hung for ringing in the full-circle English way hang in Church of England church or cathedral towers. The use of the bells is within the sole prerogative of the incumbent of the parish or the dean of the cathedral. A few rings hang in Roman Catholic churches and a few in public or private buildings (eg Manchester Town Hall, Quex Park in East Kent).  There are now an increasing number of mini-rings owned by individuals to allow them to practise change ringing whenever they want.

Each tower aims to have its own band of ringers. The tower captain is appointed by and is responsible to the Parochial Church Council (PCC) for running the tower and ringing.

Change Ringing has been described as a team sport, a highly coordinated musical performance, an antique art, and a demanding exercise that involves a group of people ringing rhythmically a set of tuned bells through a series of changing sequences that are determined by mathematical principles and executed according to learned patterns. It is, indeed, a fascinating, social, physical and mental activity suitable for people between 10 and 90 years old!  See this animated video!

To provide an organisation and opportunity for ringers to get together to practise and improve their change ringing, associations or guilds started to develop in the 17th century and by the late 19th century they covered most diocese or counties. More recently they have flourished within universities as well.

This area is covered by the Peterborough Diocesan Guild of Church Bell Ringers, which has ten branches through which the Guild meets its objectives. These are:

Ringing For Divine Service
Recruiting And Training of Ringers
Encouraging The Art of Change Ringing
Helping Ringers To Improve Their Standard Of Ringing
Care And Restoration Of Bells And Their Fittings 

Charwelton is within the Culworth Branch and the other towers within the Daventry Branch

There are about 40,000 bell-ringers in the English tradition and they form a world-wide fraternity in which you are welcome to ring in most places, simply by turning up on practice night or to ring for a service.  The greeting is usually: “Do you ring?”,  “What would you like to ring?”

All the associations and guilds get together within the Central Council of Church Bell Ringers.   It has many working groups that assist in all matters of bell ringing and bell maintenance. 

 

Glenys
Hello and welcome to our church. If you are a new visitor, we have a page for you to get to know us and learn more about planning a visit.
Click here to see more.

Planning your Visit

A Warm Hello 

The following information is specifically for those planning a visit, so that you know, beforehand, what to expect on a Sunday morning.

Where and When

We meet in five Church Buildings - well, six including a small chapel (details below) for our Sunday Services. Currently we are running a "Recovery Stage" plan of services as we return to our buildings after Lockdown, you can find it here. Take a look at the online diary to see what service is happening where and when. We recommend arriving 10-15 minutes early to ensure you find a parking space and find somewhere to sit before the service begins. When you arrive, you should be greeted by someone and handed anything you need to guide you through the service.

When we are allowed to again, some of our churches will serve tea, coffee and biscuits following the service so don't dash off, it is a great way to meet people, or simply take time to find your bearings. All refreshments are free.

Plan your journey: 
Visit the Our Churches page and click on the name of the church you want, at the bottom of the page you will find a what3words link which will open a map showing you precisely where the church building is.

Alternatively, Open Google Maps

Accessibility: If you need assistance, please let one of the Welcome Team know on your arrival and they will help you to get set up. There are disabled toilets in Badby church.

Our Service

The main service begins with a warm welcome from one of our team members. The service might be led by Malcolm (our Rector) or one of the Ministry Team or even a visiting member of clergy. In normal When we are allowed to once agian then at some point we will sing a hymn or song, we can and still do hear a short passage read from the Bible and then the leader will then explain what that passage is all about - how God speaks to us through his Word and how we can apply it to our lives. We will pray and join in some responses (you don't have to if you don't feel it is appropriate) and there might be a short symbolic meal called Communion or a baptism when we welcome someone into our Church fellowship and family. Of course, you don't have to do any of these things, they might seem strange the first time you encounter them, so take your time and don't feel any pressure.

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What about my kids?

Children and young people are very welcome in our church buildings and services.

Children stay with their parent or grown-up throughout the service and we really value worshipping God all together as a family.

Children

Getting Connected


Small Groups

While Sundays are a great way to meet new people, it is often in smaller gatherings that you can really get to know someone. Soon we will be starting up a Fellowship Group where we can explore together what it means to be a Christian today, discover what God has to teach us through the Bible, pray for one another , share our hopes and hurts and hopefully (when restrictions permit) also great cake and coffee. Being part of a small group like that will allow you to make new friends, share together and support each other.  Check out Small Groups and see if it would be a good time for you could join, or we can put you in touch with the Fellowship Group leader who will be more than happy to invite you along to their group.

Serving and Volunteering

If you want to get involved in the life of the church and help us make Sundays and week day events run smoothly, you can sign up to serve on a team, why not speak to someone on the welcome team at church. 

 
Get in touch with us to plan your visit
If you would like to come and visit the church beforehand you are more than welcome! Get in touch and we can arrange a time that suits you.
 
Name:
Telephone:
Email Address:
Comments / Questions or anything you would like to say?

Next, we will contact you by email to say hello and help arrange anything necessary for your visit.
 

Leadership 

20190809 194930 (2)   No Photo icon
Revd Malcolm Ingham   Liz Ingham
Malcolm was born in the North West and then trained in the South West, and Midlands before working just about everywhere. He once worked in an advertising agency in London and then for several national and international mission agencies. He is married to Liz with two grown up children and loves walking, music and bizzarre films (according to the rest of the family).   Benefice Administrator
 
We hope that whoever you are, you will feel at home at our church.

Best Wishes

Malcolm sig (2)